Read-A-Thon

My Spin Pick: Grapes of Wrath

I’ve only read one work by John Steinbeck: Of Mice and Men. I have never cried as hard or as long as when I read the final chapters of that book. John Steinbeck is famous for his depressing plots, so I need to be in the right head-space to read Grapes of Wrath.

Nevertheless, I am excited to pick it up in the next week. Grapes of Wrath has been on my physical TBR for many years. My edition was given to me by a high school teacher before she retired.

Here is what Goodreads has to say about the book:

Image result for grapes of wrath"

First published in 1939, Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning epic of the Great Depression chronicles the Dust Bowl migration of the 1930s and tells the story of one Oklahoma farm family, the Joads—driven from their homestead and forced to travel west to the promised land of California. Out of their trials and their repeated collisions against the hard realities of an America divided into Haves and Have-Nots evolves a drama that is intensely human yet majestic in its scale and moral vision, elemental yet plainspoken, tragic but ultimately stirring in its human dignity. A portrait of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless, of one man’s fierce reaction to injustice, and of one woman’s stoical strength, the novel captures the horrors of the Great Depression and probes into the very nature of equality and justice in America. At once a naturalistic epic, captivity narrative, road novel, and transcendental gospel, Steinbeck’s powerful landmark novel is perhaps the most American of American Classics.

The Great Depression is an era that I don’t know much about. Hopefully, this work will inspire me to learn more about this important time in American history.

___________________

The Reading Spin challenge is hosted quarterly by the Classics Club blog.

2 thoughts on “My Spin Pick: Grapes of Wrath”

  1. I was really hoping I would have got this in the spin too but it was not to be….. Mice and Men was the first Steinbeck I read and I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it – then I read Cannery Row which was different but equally as good. Now I’m ready to start on the novels that are even more ‘meaty’ in subject and tone

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s