Reflections

I Haven’t Published a Paper Yet…

laptop turned onIn the United States, PhD programs are 5-7 years long. Although programs expect students to finish in 5 years, most do not. Before starting my program, I thought I would begin publishing articles at the start of my third year. For two years in a row, I’ve vowed to submit my work to an academic journal. Yet despite what hiring committees might claim about the importance of publishing in graduate school, PhD programs privilege coursework over publications and grants – at least in the humanities.

Don’t get me wrong. There are steps I could have taken to get this article written. I could have scrolled less, managed my time better, and woken up earlier. There are certainly students who have published by the end of their third year. However, I would like to bring attention to the hefty work load students assume in the first 2 to 3 years of their programs. This semester, I have a lighter workload than usual because I am studying at the University of Geneva, where students complete 1, maybe 2, assessments for each course and read one book per course per semester. Yet, my colleagues back at my home university are required to read hundreds of pages per week, teach beginning language courses, and grade numerous assignments. Where can they find the time to write presentations, book chapters, and/or articles?

If national conferences, single-author papers, book chapters, and grants are the current metrics of academic success, why don’t graduate programs prioritize these tasks ? Why don’t professors encourage their students to work on a single piece all semester, rather than in the final three weeks of class? I am convinced that a course dedicated to academic publishing would give students the time and resources to prepare a piece for publication. Besides, I’ve learned more from the act of writing research papers than from reading a series of semi-related books for a course.

As I enter 2020, I know that my resolution will once again be the submission of a paper for publication. I really need to set aside time every week for important task. But I also have a PhD exam at the end of the spring semester covering 70+ texts as well as final exams for the courses I’m taking in Geneva. Here’s to 2020!

Reflections

On Graduate School (again!)

Every Thanksgiving, I intend to catch up with my work but I never do. I read a few things, but only one book was course-related. Tomorrow, my colleagues will also complain that they didn’t get anything done during the break. But it was an American holiday. I got to spend some much-needed time with my family.

I returned an hour ago from the Philadelphia airport. Thankfully, I caught the last trolley for the night. I forgot that public transportation is limited on Sunday nights. Although I can’t say that I have jet lag, flying always makes me tired, no matter how short the flight. I am also extra-alert during security and on public transportation. You never know who you’ll encounter.

But I’m back.

And now, I have a million and one pages to write by the end of the December. I’m glad that I have been writing daily for the past few weeks because I need the self-motivation to write every day in December. Of course, I am still in the planning phase. I barely know what topic I will be writing about, let alone what sources to cite. The writing marathon occurs during the last few weeks of each semester. I’ve been doing one for years, but this year’s will be the hardest one yet. NaNoWriMo participants don’t have to edit their writing, but graduate students have to write 15-25 pages for multiple classes AND write them well.

Marathon writing just doesn’t seem very efficient or practical. Why are we assigned so many books?

The truth is that I’m kind of tired of taking courses. I just want to start my dissertation research already. Most of us can learn from reading lists. It’s impossible to balance the writing marathon with regular coursework. Texts are still assigned during the last few weeks of classes. Of course, no one can balance everything. Something has to give. What matters more? Writing final papers or reading an assigned book that will never appear on an MA or a PhD exam list?

I know. I know. I’m complaining. Courses aren’t completely useless. I’m just frustrated by the inefficiency of the American graduate system.

Undergrads need to pass courses so that they can obtain a degree. Their professional development mostly occurs in the workforce. They are thrown into the “real” world with some skills and basic knowledge of their field. Aspiring academics, on the other hand, are supposed to receive their professional development in graduate school. Isn’t that why we get a master’s or a doctorate?

Programs should emphasize writing throughout the semester. Writers improve through practice. Humanities students are supposed to be writers. Maybe English students have more training in that area than foreign language students, but I am increasingly alarmed by the number of fifth and sixth year students who have never published a paper. I worry that graduate programs are so course-centered that they are blind to the academic market. In a publish-or-die industry, graduate programs should train their students to publish their work. Students should also be encouraged to write for non-university publications.

True, graduate students are adults. They need to be self-driven. But graduate schools should also care about the professional development of their students. We are more than cheap labor.

Miscellaneous

University Press Week (Nov. 6-11)

This week is University Press Week. I am a huge champion of university presses and the books they publish. In a society increasingly hostile to education, one way you can fight back is to support university presses dedicated to the acquisition and sharing of knowledge!

UP Week includes a blog tour: http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/university-press-week/university-press-week-2017/2017-blog-tour#Wednesday

You can keep up with news related to UP Week on #upweek. For tips related to academic publishing, I recommend @PrincetonUPress and their #AskanEditor series.